These articles can help you get the most out of your Hydrow workouts!

  • Foundations of Rowing Form plus icon minus icon
  • This resource is meant for anyone who wants a refresher on the foundations of rowing form. We worked with our Athletes and Member Services team to create a guide that explains every detail of the r... View More
  • How Do I Get a Better Workout While Rowing? plus icon minus icon
  • We hear this question frequently from new Hydrow users, especially those who are also new to rowing as a sport! Some other closely related questions are: How do I feel it more in my legs? How do I... View More
  • How to Lower Your Split plus icon minus icon
  • There are a lot of factors that contribute to each individual rower's split times. You might not pull the same splits as the athlete, but it's likely you're pulling similar splits to the other Hydr... View More
  • Why is the Athlete faster than me? We’re going at the same Rhythm Rate. plus icon minus icon
  • Your split time is an estimation of how much time it would take you to row 500 meters, if you maintained the exact same level of speed of your current stroke. Essentially, it functions as the most ... View More
  • Rowing Tips for Our Shorter Hydrow Members! plus icon minus icon
  • It's definitely true that being taller—having longer legs and arms, i.e. longer tools that help increase leverage—helps a lot in the sport of rowing. But that doesn’t mean you can’t be competitive ... View More
  • Watts vs Splits plus icon minus icon
  • The number indicated by /500m is referred to as your split time. It is an estimation of how much time it would take you to row 500 meters if you maintained the exact same level of speed of your cur... View More
  • Managing Your Rowing at Different Rhythm Numbers plus icon minus icon
  • Should I match the Athlete stroke-for-stroke, or just row on my own at the suggested S/M number? We suggest trying to match the Athlete movements.  This helps connect your body in a natural way to ... View More
  • How to Stop "Shooting the Slide" plus icon minus icon
  • This is when you push off with the legs on the drive, but the handle doesn't move backward with them. If you think about it like lifting a barbell off the ground, it would be as though you push wit... View More
  • Heels Lifting at the Catch plus icon minus icon
  • The position you want to be in at the catch is with your shins vertical (perpendicular to the floor) with knees stacked over the ankles. Your heels may or may not come up in this position (this is ... View More
  • Rhythm Rate (or Stroke Rate) plus icon minus icon
  • Your rhythm rate (marked s/m) indicates the amount of strokes you take per minute. Breathes typically work lower rhythms (think 20-24s/m), Drives typically work higher rhythms (think 26-34s/m) and... View More
  • Toes Lifting at the Finish plus icon minus icon
  • Maintaining foot connection without pulling against the straps with your toes is a really common technical point, so it's great you're aware of it! Here is a video that might prove to be helpful as... View More
  • Too Much Upper Body Engagement plus icon minus icon
  • Each of the different muscle groups of the body are engaged throughout the stroke, so feeling it in your arms and shoulders makes sense! At the catch (when you are closest to the monitor) you start... View More
  • Relaxing the Grip (Hanging off the Handle) plus icon minus icon
  • This is a key concept that all rowers encounter and we are happy to provide some additional insight!  Look down at your hands and make sure your wrists are flat (i.e. parallel to the floor).  The ... View More
  • Muscle isolation drill plus icon minus icon
  • This is a really common drill that all rowers do frequently to help you feel and concentrate on how much pressure you can apply with each muscle group. You can row to a journey workout so you are a... View More
  • Ladder drill plus icon minus icon
  • This is a fun one to do when you're trying to beat your own times. You can do this on your own in a Journey workout or you can think about it while you're doing a pyramid workout (you can search fo... View More
  • Leg Engagement plus icon minus icon
  • Thanks for reaching out with your question. This is a key concept that all rowers encounter and we are happy to provide some additional insight!  As you begin the recovery moving forward to the cat... View More
  • Legs-only drill plus icon minus icon
  • This is a really common drill that is used by rowers at every level of experience. Many crews include this drill in their daily warm up as it is very beneficial in engaging the glutes, enforcing a ... View More
  • Feet Out Drill plus icon minus icon
  • Rowing feet out is great for a few things:  Connection & stability一by taking away the security of the foot strap, we are forced to keep our feet pressed through the footbeds and use the core to st... View More
  • Pick Drill and Reverse Pick Drill plus icon minus icon
  • The pick drill & reverse pick drill are standard warm up drills used by rowers of all experience levels and are great to incorporate into your warmup, cool down or even recovery phases during a wor... View More
  • Holding The Handle plus icon minus icon
  • Generally we give the following simple advice Hold the handle lightly in your curled fingers. Thumbs underneath. Not so loose that it might slip out of your hands but also not a tight or tense gri... View More
  • Low Splits at Low Rhythm Rates plus icon minus icon
  • This is a concept that all rowers (no matter the experience level) grapple with all the time! When you push harder with your legs, your rhythm rate likely increases because you are physically movin... View More